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have

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have/ˈhæv, əv;/
in “have to” meaning “must” usually/ˈhæf/verb
has/ˈhæz, əz;/in “has to” meaning “must” usually/ˈhæs/had/ˈhæd, əd/having/ˈhævɪŋ/
have
/ˈhæv, əv;/in “have to” meaning “must” usually/ˈhæf/
verb
has/ˈhæz, əz;/in “has to” meaning “must” usually/ˈhæs/had/ˈhæd, əd/having/ˈhævɪŋ/
Learner's definition of HAVE  
◊ For many senses of have, the phrase have got can also be used. Each sense, idiom, or phrasal verb below in which this phrase can occur includes the note “—also have got.” See “have got” (below) for more information.
not used in progressive tenses [+ object] 
: to own, use, or hold (something) — also used for things that cannot be seen or touched — also have got
— see also must-have
   b 
◊ If you have (something) to do, finish (etc.), there is something that you must do or want to do in order to complete a task.
— also have got
not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  — used to say that something is available or not available — also have got
— see also have the time (below)
not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  — used to describe a quality, skill, feature, etc., of a person or thing — also have got
not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  : to include or contain (something or someone) — also have got
[+ object] 
: to give birth to (a child)
   b  not used in progressive tenses  : to be the parent of (a child) — also have got
not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  — used to describe a relationship between people — also have got
not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  : to tightly hold (someone) — also have got
not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  : to get (something)
not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  : to receive or be given (something)
10  not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  — used to describe the position of a person or thing — also have got
11  [+ object]  : to cause or produce (something, such as an effect)
[+ object] 
12  : to experience (something)
   b  not used in progressive tenses  : to experience or be affected by (an illness or injury) — also have got
   c  : to experience (an emotion or feeling) — also have got
13  not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  — used to describe a person's thoughts, ideas, etc. — also have got
14  [+ object]  : to perform (an action) : to do or participate in (an activity)
15  [+ object]  : to provide (something) as entertainment or as a social gathering
[+ object] 
16  : to cause, tell, or ask (someone) to do something
   b  : to cause (something) to be changed, removed, added, or affected in a specified way
   c  — used when you hire someone to do something or when you go to a place (such as hospital or a mechanic's shop) so that something can be done
17  [+ object]  — used to say that someone (such as a guest or a worker) is at your home or is coming to your home
— see also have over (below)
not used in progressive tenses [+ object] 
18  : to cause (something) to be in a specified state or condition — also have got
   b  — used when something that belongs to someone or something is damaged, destroyed, or taken
19  [+ object]  : to allow (something) — used in negative statements
20  not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  : to accept (someone)
specifically  : to accept (someone) as a husband or wife
21  not used in progressive tenses[+ object]  : to be able to control, capture, or defeat (someone) — also have got
   b 
◊ The phrases You have me there and There you have me or (more commonly and informally) You've/You got me (there) are used in speech to mean “I don't know.”
The phrase You got me is sometimes shortened to Got me in very informal speech.
[+ object] 
22  : to eat or drink (something)
   b  : to smoke (something)
   c  — used to say how you want food or drink to be cooked or prepared
23  not used in progressive tenses[+ object]informal  : to have sex with (someone)
24  [auxiliary verb]  — used with the past participle to form the perfect tenses of verbs
Usage   When have is used as an auxiliary verb, the shortened forms 've for have, 's for has, and 'd for had are common in informal writing and usual in speech. The negative forms haven't, hasn't, and hadn't are also common in informal writing and usual in speech.

be had

: to be tricked or fooled by someone

have against

[phrasal verb]
have (something) against (someone or something) 
: to have (something) as a reason for not liking (someone or something) — also have got

have back

[phrasal verb]
have (something) back  : to receive (something that is returned to you)
have (someone) back 
: to be with (someone who has returned) again
   b  : to allow (someone) to return

have done with

old-fashioned
: to stop doing (something) : to bring (something) to an end

have got

: have
Usage   Examples of have got are shown above and below for each sense, idiom, and phrasal verb in which it occurs. Note that have got is used only in the present tense. It is common in place of have in informal writing, and it is usual in ordinary speech. The contracted forms 's for has and 've for have are commonly used for the first part of this phrase. The usual negative forms of have got are haven't got and hasn't got.

have had it

informal
: to be too old or damaged to be used
   b  : to be so tired or annoyed that you will no longer allow or accept something
   c  : to be angry about something that has continued for a long time
: to be completely ruined or defeated

have it

— used to say that what is being reported is a rumor, a story, etc.
— used to describe a person's condition or situation — also have got

have it in for

: to want to hurt or cause problems for (someone you do not like) — also have got

have it in you

: to have the ability to do something — also have got

have it out

: to settle a disagreement by talking or arguing

have mercy/pity

: to treat someone with mercy or pity — usually + on

have on

[phrasal verb]
have (something) on or have on (something)  : to be wearing (something) — also have got
have (something) on (you)informal  : to be carrying (something) — also have got
have (something) on  : to keep (a device or machine) operating
have (something) onchiefly British  : to have plans for (something) — also have got
have (someone) onBritish, informal  : to trick or fool (someone) in a joking way — usually used as (be) having (someone) on
have nothing on (someone) or not have anything on (someone)  : to have no evidence showing that someone has committed a crime or done something bad — also have got
have nothing on (someone or something)  : to have less of a particular quality than (someone or something) — also have got

have over

[phrasal verb]
have (someone) over 
— used to say that someone is coming to your home as a guest
— see also have 17 (above)

have (someone or something) (all) to yourself

: to be in a situation in which you are not required to share someone or something with anyone else

have the time

◊ If someone asks you if you have the time, that person is asking if you know what time it is.
— also have got
— see also have 2 (above)

have to

: must : : such as
◊ Note the difference in meaning between not have to and must not.
— used to say that something is required or necessary — also have got to
   b  — used to say that something is required by a rule or law — also have got to
   c  — used to say that something is desired or should be done — also have got to
   d  — used to say that something is very likely — also have got to
   e  — used in various spoken phrases to emphasize a statement — also have got to
   f  — used in questions or statements that express annoyance or anger — also have got to

have to do with

— see 1do

have with

[phrasal verb]
have (someone) with (you)  : to be with (someone)
have (something) with (you)  : to be carrying (something) with (you)

I have it

— used to say that you suddenly remember, understand, or have found something — usually I've got it

I'll have you know

— used to emphasize something in a somewhat annoyed or angry way

there you have it

— used to say that something has just been shown, described, or stated in a very clear and definite way

what have you

— see 1what

you had to be there

— used to say that people cannot understand something because they did not experience it or see it themselves
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